Safety In The Glass Studio

  Material

  Hazard

  Precaution

Sheet glass, cullet, billets

a) Cuts during scoring and breaking.

b) Chips in the eyes during scoring and breaking.

 

c) Dust and powder are created during grinding. This may irritate the eyes, skin, and respiratory system. If glass is ground extremely fine, the hazard depends on the solubility of any toxic metals it contains.

a) Gloves provide some protection against cuts but often hamper dexterity. Glass cuts are generally clean. Flush with hydrogen peroxide and bandage. Wear gauntlets when handling sheets over eight square feet.

b) Always wear eye protection. Safety glasses should have side shields. Goggles are recommended during grinding.

 

c) Use water when grinding or polishing to keep tools and glass cool and to keep dust down. Clean up ground glass slag while it is still wet to prevent it from becoming airborne. When dealing with dry glass dust and powder, wear a NIOSH-approved respirator and replace the filter cartridge regularly. Use local ventilation.

Glass frit and powder

Dust and powder may irritate the eyes, skin, and respiratory system. If glass is ground extremely fine, the hazard depends on the solubility of any toxic metals it contains.

Be cautious with frit from lead-bearing glass, as it may be both irritating and toxic.

When working with dry glass powder, always wear a NIOSH-approved respirator and replace the filter cartridge regularly. Use local ventilation.

Shelf primer and kiln wash

Silica dust. Inhaling can cause respiratory irritation. Long-term exposure may cause silicosis.

Wear a NIOSH-approved respirator when mixing dry powder or scraping fired shelves clean. Use local ventilation.

Ceramic fiber products

Fibers can irritate eyes, skin, and respiratory system, particularly when cut or torn. After firing, fiber products readily release dusts that may be dangerous to breathe.

Avoid contact with skin. Wear a respirator designed to filter particulates. Clean residual fibers from glass with running water. Dispose of used materials in a sealed plastic bag.

ThinFire Shelf Paper

When fired, disintegrates into a dusty tissue that can irritate eyes, skin, and respiratory system.

a) Avoid contact with skin. Wear a respirator designed to filter particulates. Clean residual fibers from glass with running water. Dispose of used materials in a sealed plastic bag.

b) Avoid breathing residual dust. Vacuum kiln using a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter vacuum, or remove dust by saturating it with water and collecting in a plastic bag.

Wax

Overheated and burning wax produces acrolein and aldehydes, which are respiratory irritants and suspected human carcinogens.

Avoid overheating wax. No respirator filters out all of the hazardous components present in wax vapors. Steam wax out of molds rather than burning it out.

Plaster

Skin, eye, and respiratory irritant. Contains mild alkalis and can produce burns.

Wear safety goggles and a NIOSH-approved respirator while mixing investment or divesting molds and use local ventilation. Wear gloves and/or use a protective cream on hands.

Silica

Irritates respiratory system. Long- term exposure may cause silicosis.

Wear a NIOSH-approved particulate respirator and use local ventilation.

Talc

Respiratory irritant. Dusts may irritate the eyes.

Wear safety goggles and a NIOSH-approved respirator and use local ventilation.

Enamels

May contain heavy metals.

Wear protective gloves. Do not wash down drain. Consult MSDS for further information.